Reflecting on Reading at University: a student perspective

Samantha Sharman is one of the student researchers on our project. She is in the second year of a Classical Studies degree at the University of Lincoln. She’s written this blog post reflecting on her experiences of reading at university. Each of the members of the team (https://makingdigitalhistory.co.uk/read/active-online-reading/project-team/) will be doing the same, so thanksContinue reading Reflecting on Reading at University: a student perspective

A conversation about the challenges and opportunities of online reading

As part of the Active Online Reading project, Matt East recently conducted an interview with Roy Hanney, Matthew Lea, Paul Stevens, and Martin Hughes from Southampton Solent University about the challenges associated with getting students to read, their approaches to engaging students in reading and how the pandemic affected online reading practices and pedagogies. YouContinue reading A conversation about the challenges and opportunities of online reading

Launching the Active Online Reading project

Last week saw the official launch of the Active Online Reading project, which is co-funded by the QAA and Talis as part of the former’s Collaborative Enhancement scheme. You can see a recording of the launch event here. The project will run until spring 2022 and will involve staff and students from a range ofContinue reading Launching the Active Online Reading project

An interview with Katherine Fennelly – Digital Mapping of the 18th and 19th-century British Landscape

Unfortunately, it’s taken me a while to get the second interview in this series written up. In any case, I’m very please to be able to share my discussions with Dr Katherine Fennelly, an historical archaeologist at the University of Sheffield, about her use of digital mapping technologies when teaching in the School of HistoryContinue reading An interview with Katherine Fennelly – Digital Mapping of the 18th and 19th-century British Landscape

An interview with Charles West – Using Wikipedia to Teach Medieval History and Digital Literacy

The Making Digital History project is particularly concerned with approaches to teaching history online that involve students in constructing things for themselves (including their own knowledge and understanding via more ‘traditional’ text-based approaches) in digital spaces and sharing the results of their endeavours beyond their tutors and peers. I thought it would be interesting toContinue reading An interview with Charles West – Using Wikipedia to Teach Medieval History and Digital Literacy