Social Annotation and Student Learning

In this post, the final in a series of three that survey literature on online reading, Rachel Bartley (UCL) offers an overview of pedagogic research into the use of social annotation in higher education. You can read the first and second parts of the literature review here and here. In negotiating the advantages and challengesContinue reading Social Annotation and Student Learning

Confidence is key: Building students’ academic reading literacies through collaborative annotation

In this guest post, Aimee Merrydew, a Curriculum Developer at Keele University, shares her experiences and reflections on teaching using a collaborative annotation approach in the School of English there. We hope that you enjoy the post! I spend a lot of my time helping students to understand the differences between reading texts for funContinue reading Confidence is key: Building students’ academic reading literacies through collaborative annotation

Talking Xerte at Lincoln

A few weeks ago we heard that we’d been successful in getting some project funding from the Centre for Educational Research and Development as part of their Fund for Educational Development. The project will involve sharing our experiences of using Xerte in History with colleagues at Lincoln. We’ll also be bringing in participants from elsewhere (Biological Sciences, Media, Psychology) inContinue reading Talking Xerte at Lincoln

Dr Mark Horowitz visits the University of Lincoln to talk about Making Digital History

We were lucky enough to have Dr Mark Horowitz from the University of Illinois, Chicago visit us last week (22nd and 23rd October 2013) to give three presentations to History students at the University of Lincoln; partly funded by the Making Digital History project. The first in the series of presentations was for the MAContinue reading Dr Mark Horowitz visits the University of Lincoln to talk about Making Digital History

Curate history (and your other interests…) on the web – part 2

In an earlier post I talked about Scoop.it, a site for bringing together content from different websites (blogs, YouTube, regular webpages, RSS feeds) and ‘curating’ it. Over the past few days I’ve been playing around with a similar service called Feedly. Feedly is described as a ‘magazine style news reader’ – it allows you toContinue reading Curate history (and your other interests…) on the web – part 2