Social Annotation and Student Learning

In this post, the final in a series of three that survey literature on online reading, Rachel Bartley (UCL) offers an overview of pedagogic research into the use of social annotation in higher education. You can read the first and second parts of the literature review here and here. In negotiating the advantages and challengesContinue reading Social Annotation and Student Learning

Comparing Digital and Print Academic Reading

In this post, the second in a series of three that survey literature on online reading, Rachel Bartley (UCL) addresses the issue of print vs. digital reading. You can read the first part of the literature review here. Digital devices’ place at the centre of academic research and students’ academic engagement is now largely accepted,Continue reading Comparing Digital and Print Academic Reading

Confidence is key: Building students’ academic reading literacies through collaborative annotation

In this guest post, Aimee Merrydew, a Curriculum Developer at Keele University, shares her experiences and reflections on teaching using a collaborative annotation approach in the School of English there. We hope that you enjoy the post! I spend a lot of my time helping students to understand the differences between reading texts for funContinue reading Confidence is key: Building students’ academic reading literacies through collaborative annotation

Reading online: the double-edged sword

In the next post as part of the Active Online Reading project, Anna Rich-Abad (staff profile here), Assistant Professor in Medieval History, University of Nottingham, offers her perspective on the challenges of reading (and searching online). I miss the “good old times” when research was done on physical documents and books; visits to libraries andContinue reading Reading online: the double-edged sword

What we have learned so far from the Active Online Reading surveys

In this blog post, Matt East (Talis Education) shares some initial findings from the Active Online Reading project’s international surveys of staff and students. A key strand of the Active Online Reading project has involved surveying staff and students on their experiences of online reading, both in terms of their personal practice and, in theContinue reading What we have learned so far from the Active Online Reading surveys