The Keyword Conundrum: How We Read Primary Sources

In addition to student reflections on their reading practices (see here for our first one), academic members of the Active Online Reading project are sharing insights into various aspects of their own reading pedagogies and practices. Dr Jon Chandler (UCL) is the first to offer his thoughts – on the reading of primary sources. ItContinue reading The Keyword Conundrum: How We Read Primary Sources

An interview with Katherine Fennelly – Digital Mapping of the 18th and 19th-century British Landscape

Unfortunately, it’s taken me a while to get the second interview in this series written up. In any case, I’m very please to be able to share my discussions with Dr Katherine Fennelly, an historical archaeologist at the University of Sheffield, about her use of digital mapping technologies when teaching in the School of HistoryContinue reading An interview with Katherine Fennelly – Digital Mapping of the 18th and 19th-century British Landscape

An interview with Charles West – Using Wikipedia to Teach Medieval History and Digital Literacy

The Making Digital History project is particularly concerned with approaches to teaching history online that involve students in constructing things for themselves (including their own knowledge and understanding via more ‘traditional’ text-based approaches) in digital spaces and sharing the results of their endeavours beyond their tutors and peers. I thought it would be interesting toContinue reading An interview with Charles West – Using Wikipedia to Teach Medieval History and Digital Literacy

Pandemic Pedagogy – Beyond essays and exams: changing the rules of the assessment game

This post is part of History UK’s Pandemic Pedagogy project. For more about the initiative, follow HUK’s blog and Twitter feed. Assessment, carrots and sticks ‘Assessment is an integral part of instruction, as it determines whether or not the goals of education are being met.’ (Edutopia, 2008) The centrality of assessment to learning in higherContinue reading Pandemic Pedagogy – Beyond essays and exams: changing the rules of the assessment game