Comparing Digital and Print Academic Reading

In this post, the second in a series of three that survey literature on online reading, Rachel Bartley (UCL) addresses the issue of print vs. digital reading. You can read the first part of the literature review here. Digital devices’ place at the centre of academic research and students’ academic engagement is now largely accepted,Continue reading Comparing Digital and Print Academic Reading

Reading online: the double-edged sword

In the next post as part of the Active Online Reading project, Anna Rich-Abad (staff profile here), Assistant Professor in Medieval History, University of Nottingham, offers her perspective on the challenges of reading (and searching online). I miss the “good old times” when research was done on physical documents and books; visits to libraries andContinue reading Reading online: the double-edged sword

What we have learned so far from the Active Online Reading surveys

In this blog post, Matt East (Talis Education) shares some initial findings from the Active Online Reading project’s international surveys of staff and students. A key strand of the Active Online Reading project has involved surveying staff and students on their experiences of online reading, both in terms of their personal practice and, in theContinue reading What we have learned so far from the Active Online Reading surveys

Some interim findings of the Active Online Reading student survey

Yesterday, we presented some interim findings from our student survey in a poster at a Unesco Inclusive Policy Lab event, Education and Digital Skills: A Conversation Event. You can see the poster here: You can also download the poster as a pdf here. We’ll be writing a longer blog post early next week with moreContinue reading Some interim findings of the Active Online Reading student survey

Undermining Learning: The Potential Dangers of Digital Reading

In this post, one of our student researchers, Samantha Sharman (Lincoln), offers a short summary of a recent article by Naomi S. Baron on digital technologies, especially reading online, can sometimes undermine learning. Baron’s article provides an interesting insight into the science behind how we learn, and the difference in knowledge retention when using digitalContinue reading Undermining Learning: The Potential Dangers of Digital Reading