A brief update to let you know about some impending less-brief updates!

It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything to this blog. Life, you know, took over, so time has been at a premium. That doesn’t mean that we’ve not been busy with digital education projects here in History at Lincoln – it’s just that we’ve not had much chance to share our work on this blog. Given the ‘current context’, it seemed like a good time to give a few updates.

For the past two years, we’ve been especially busy in contributing to the development of a new resource annotation and collaboration tool called Talis Elevate (developed by Talis, a company offers a bunch of library-related online services). I was initially attracted to the tool because it replicated some of the approaches I’d tried with social bookmarking services in the past (for research papers, see here and here). My colleagues and I have found Elevate to be a powerful tool for supporting student learning, especially in text-based disciplines such as History (although it has much broader applicability). I’ve collected a few materials here and hope to add more soon. Do get in touch if you’ve any questions, especially if they pertain to the use of Elevate in History teaching.

In addition to updating you briefly on recent work, I wanted to signal that over the next few weeks I’ll be writing some more posts on the current situation as we move out of emergency lock-down teaching to considering what to do during the next academic year (and how to do it). I’ll start with some reflections on my experience over the past 2+ months, before giving you an overview of the results of a couple of surveys we’ve done of the staff and students in the School since we finished teaching.

As a taster, here’s a word cloud showing frequency of responses to the question ‘How would you describe (briefly) your experience of the shift to entirely online delivery of teaching and learning since March?’.

Word cloud - transition to online teaching

NB – we had 39 responses to the survey…

More soon!

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